Heritage Caucus

The Heritage Caucus meets every Wednesday morning during the legislative session from 7 - 8 a.m. in the Cherberg Building, Rooms ABC, Capitol Campus, Olympia.  Sen. Jim Honeyford (R), 15th District, and Rep. Steve Tharinger (D), 24th District, serve as co-chairs of the Caucus. 

Susan Rohrer of the Washington State Historical Society (WSHS) and Glenda Carino of the Washington State Arts Commission (ArtsWA), serve as staff at the meetings.

To receive email notification of Heritage Caucus meetings and related legislative news, contact Susan Rohrer, Washington State Historical Society. To request bills to be tracked, contact Glenda Carino.

Heritage Caucus Agenda - March 7, 2018 (Last Heritage Caucus of the Session)

7:00am - Welcome/Introductions – Senator Honeyford, Representative Tharinger       

7:05am - Bill Report / Agency Reportng

7:25am - Presentation by Ryan Karlson, Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission                         

7:40am - Presentation by Mary Dodsworth, City of Lakewood Parks, Recreation and Community Services

7:55am - For the Good of the Order

8:00am - Adjourn


Bill Report

Heritage Caucus Bill Report - March 7, 2018

Bill reports are compiled for the Heritage Caucus and are available on this website by 5:00 p.m. the Tuesday before the Caucus meeting. For the most current information on legislation, please visit the Washington State Legislature Bill information page.


The week in Washington History from HistoryLink

“On March 7, 1982, Washington’s House of Representatives voted to cover up murals in the House chamber that had recently been commissioned by the state. Some legislators felt that the Twelve Labors of Hercules by Michael Spafford was too abstract and some considered the artwork too obscene.” The controversy continued.
 
“For 20 years the Spafford murals and the Alden Mason murals in the Senate chamber had a lengthy political and judicial journey. They were eventually removed and relocated to Centralia College where they can be seen today. Both artists wanted the site-specific work destroyed instead of hung in another location.”

 


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